Our Extended Family History

Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 233

      1 2 3 4 5 Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1  Family F146
 
2  Leitheiser, Albert William (I875)
 
3 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1293)
 
4 (from obituary) Dick was a full blooded Kashube and proud of it. Hewas an alumnus of Marquette University, a retiree of Allen Bradleyafter 38 years of service, a US Army veteran of WWII and a recipientof the Bronze Star. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus -Cardinal Stritch Council #4614 for 57 years. Board of Directors of ABCredit Union for 51 years, St. Veronica Adult Choir for more than 45years, and a member of the South Milwaukee Old GOATS. A heart feltthanks to Dr. Treisman and the staff of St. Lukes Medical Center. Lentz, Richard Alexander Sr. (I1159)
 
5 (might be the 9th, or 11th) Bakker, Berdena (I85)
 
6 (Very unsure of death date) Lewis, Martha Elizabeth (I1232)
 
7 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2456)
 
8 According to William’s death notice, he was stepfather to children of Adele’s with the last name of Rapp. But in an article on William in a senior living newsletter he mentions that he proposed to Adele Wilbrandt (her maiden name?) Rapp, Adele (I1675)
 
9 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1200)
 
10 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2082)
 
11 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2195)
 
12 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I84)
 
13 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I94)
 
14 After a number of years, Margie and Dr. McGreevey took Margies motherDorothy to Arizona with them to live and work. Stone, Margie (I1934)
 
15 After his father died, the family moved to Portland Oregon. Will gota job with a well drilling company in Seattle, and moved to TacomaWashington. Neher, Will (I1520)
 
16 After his wife Jane died in 1836, he remarried again that same year and went on to have 10 more children.

When Alexander passed away in 1855, 13 of his 14 children attended his funeral. The eldest, Janet, was 25 and the youngest five months. Fourth son, Neil, died before his father. 
McDonald, Alexander (I2357)
 
17 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I115)
 
18 After Marty died, she took a job as a cook on the railroad and traveled with the railroad as they built west to Idaho. She liked Idaho so she decided to stay there. Schroeder, Sophia (I1788)
 
19 Alexander Martin emigrated from Antwerp Belgium May 12, 1902, arriving in NYC May 22, 1902. Alex was a machinist at Rex Chain Belt company. Lentz, Alexander Martin (I1134)
 
20 Alice came to America with her parents in 1891 when she was 11 years old. While unconfirmed, it's generally believed that there is Jewish and Spanish blood that comes from the Goorman side of the family. Goorman, Aaltien [Alice] (I506)
 
21 Alta was George's second wife. A daughter, Vivian, from George'sfirst marriage was raised by Alta along with her children. Jack wasan adopted fourth child. Bartling, Alta (I140)
 
22 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2426)
 
23 An ancestry.com tree claims a birth year of 1857. Another source has her last name as "Grootler". Grotler, Henderika (I537)
 
24 An ancestry.com tree claims a death date of 29 Nov 1922, and states a birth city of Hesterkant, but no such city in Germany exists. Hesterberg?

He immigrated from Germany to America in Sept 1891, on the SS Rotterdam(?) 
Goorman, Gerrit Jan (I515)
 
25 Anna was one of a set of twins. Sister was Harriet who died at 3 months of Cerribritis (?). Four girls who had just made their communion bore her casket.

From Milwaukee Magazine article on Jones Island life, 1982:

[quote] Anna Lenz Sikora is now in her 80s, but her dancing eyes make it easy to imagine the delightful girl she must have been when she lived on the island. She was 17 when she moved into the city; today, she divides her time between her small South Side home and a summer cottage on Fox Lake. Her husband, Walter, still fishes and makes and mends his own string nets.

Sikora remembers her ealy years on Jones Island as being the happiest of her life.
"In the summers, we swam and had picnics and the boys would swim in the lake with nothing on when the big ship Christopher Columbus passed by and made big waves," she remembers. "And in winter, we would play in the snow and skate on the frozen river. Everyone there was so friendly; nobody ever locked their doors."

Anna's parents, JOhn Lenz and Philomina Selin, came from Danzig in 1902, after the island had already been occupied for three decades. John Lenz drowned in a fishing accident off the coast of Waukegan, where he had hired on with a fishing expedition to make more money for the family. Anna was four years old then, and can remember her mother rowing a boat back and forth across the river to work in a Milwaukee laundry to support her children.

The Lenz house was typical of the period. It contained one bedroom, a living room, a kitchen, a root cellar, and a summer kitchen. The female members of the family slept together in one room, and the males bunked in another. Anna recalls chickens living undr her house, for the island was home to a variety of small livestock, including one cow.[end quote] 
Lenz, Anna Alice (I1163)
 
26 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2338)
 
27 Arrived in Sydney from Bristol, 8 Mar 1877 (?). Lived at Pitt Street Waterloo (Sydney). Radford, John Sidney (I2551)
 
28 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I843)
 
29 At 15 years of age, he died of tetinus (lockjaw) and yellow jaundice, from a puncture wound in his foot. He had stepped on a rusty nail in the back yard and then it got infected, likely from swimming in a creek later. Bakker, William (I136)
 
30 At an early age, Florence joined the Presentation Sister's convent on Jan. 6, 1925 and became a nun -- Sister Michael. She received a degree in teaching in St. Ambrose college, Davenport, IL. She taught school for years in the Catholic school in Flandreu, SD. Leitheiser, Florence (St. Michael) (I957)
 
31 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I928)
 
32 Athol and Christine? had 10 children. Seven are listed here. Unknown if the other three died as infants or if the information was not known. Souter, Athol (I2522)
 
33 Barbara came to America with her parents when she was 6 years old(1858).

After Casper died, Barbara and her family moved to Portland Oregon. 
Herreth, Barbara (I653)
 
34 Bernadette had polio as a youn child and had to wear a leg brace on her left leg all her life. She moved to Milwaukee where she had a very successful career as a secretary in a drug distribution company. Leitheiser, Bernadette L. (I895)
 
35 Bernard graduated in 1938 in Nettleton Business College of SiouxFalls. He was a clerk between 1942 and 1980 on the Great Northern andBurlington Northern Railroads. McGinnis, Bernard (I1370)
 
36 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I121)
 
37 Bob grew up with a German foster family named Bauman in Oconomowoc,Wisconsin. Bob went to the high school there but didn't graduate. Hedid however receive his GED later. Wagner, Robert (I2095)
 
38 Body donated to science Lenz, Clarence Joseph (I1174)
 
39 Brain hemorrage Leitheiser, Franz Joseph (I963)
 
40 Button committed suicide. Radtke, Raymond Jr. (I1665)
 
41 Came to Australia in 1912. Ferris, Agnes Lilian (I2539)
 
42 Came west in 1879 with his brother Adam. Adam and Henry laid claim to land next to one another. They built a shack on Henry's land and helped Adam build his farm. He got a job working on the Milwaukee Road railroad.

The winter of 1880 was bad. The rail lines, mainly bridges, needed repair. When the railroad was running again, Henry's parents, Franz and Mary Catherine, loaded up all their belongings and went to Bridgewater to join the rest of the family. They came in 1881.

Henry sold his rights to his claim to a new homesteader for his goldwatch and took out a claim to a different quarter and tree claim, a couple of miles further east and north of his brother's farms. His brothers helped him build up his place.

He had found a girl he wanted to marry. He was going on 35 and shewas 19. Elizabeth Neher.

Henry and Elizabeth had 10 children that survived. Clara died at 2 months of whooping cough. 
Leitheiser, Henry (I977)
 
43 Casper came to America with his parents when he was 11 years old(1852) (another source says 1849, but that source also says he was 11at the time). The ship arrived in Baltimore MD.

Casper's parents were wine makers in Germany and grew their own grapesnear the Rhine River. When the sons became eligible to go into thearmy, Casper and his family came to America where each tried to findhis own place to work and live. One son went to California andstarted a winery. One went to Chicago and became a jeweler. Twosisters had a Kimona shop in Milwaukee.

Casper lived in Eau Claire Wisconsin, where he built a brewery andmanufactured beer. On one of his trips to nearby Chippawa Falls, hemet and eventually married Barbara Herreth and they lived in Augusta,Wisc. They had a boy, Frank, and a girl, Elizabeth. They were doingfine until the state voted to go dry and selling alcohol was illegal.They sold the business and his home at a great loss. He had almostnothing left, certainly not enough to buy what he needed to move hisfamily to the Dakota Territory. So he agreed to work for his brother(Melchior) in Creek, Nebraska until he had earned enough to buy thenecessary equipment. This was in 1878. In return for a year of work,Casper's brother fixed up a covered wagon and filled it with thesupplies he needed, along with a team of horses and a cow.

In the spring of 1879 they loaded up their belongings, left Creek, andheaded for South Dakota with a group of settlers coming to the newlyopened lands. It was slow going with the cow tied on behind, but theyneeded her milk for food. In the evenings, while Barbara cooked theirsupper, Casper staked the team and the cow out to eat grass. Thechildren gathered fuel for cooking and warmth. At last they reachedand crossed the Missouri River by ferry at Yankton.

Casper was elected commissioner and was especially interested inbuilding country schools. The first school was built five miles fromtheir home.

In 1900 the Neher family moved to Canada. Casper built a soda popfactory in Edmonton. Everything was going well until Casper cut hisarm on a broken bottle. He somehow developed blood poisoning, whichkilled him. 
Neher, Casper M. (I1503)
 
44 Charles was killed in WWI. Chell, Charles (I2487)
 
45 Charles was to get the home claim, but he became a bar owner in partnership with John Herreth. They bought the Knorr Bar.

There was a terrible fire in Bridgewater in 1926. Charley and John did not rebuild the bar. Charley moved out to the claim that his folks lived on. No one liked working on the farm. Charley had never had to work so hard and the weather was hot and he was used to working inside. He soon got sick. His family talked him into moving back to Wisconsin. He made a trip to Barton and found a house, but Charley was never again well enough to work. 
Leitheiser, Charles (I910)
 
46 Children of Irene (assumed to be from a previous marriage), are Ruth,Sharon (married someone named Brown) and Rebecca. Schafer, Irene (I1752)
 
47 Clara died at two months of whooping cough. Leitheiser, Clara Barbara (I919)
 
48 Clara married a widower with two grown sons. Neher, Clara (I1504)
 
49 Clara was born a twin, but the twin sister died at birth. Leitheiser, Clara (I917)
 
50 Clara's twin sister died at birth. Leitheiser, Clara-Twin (I918)
 

      1 2 3 4 5 Next»